Do more to develop renewable energy

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionDid you know that New York state has a moratorium on fracking? Most of us haven’t had to think about it because we believed that we had been protected from fracking’s harms. But there are other activities related to fracking that are still allowed. We import fracked gas in pipelines through our state from Pennsylvania. This means that people living in Pennsylvania are hurt by fracking so that people in New York and beyond can have the advantages of natural gas products. There are dangerously noisy and polluting compressor stations in some New York state communities. When this infrastructure is not in our neighborhood, we can ignore it.If we continue to allow these ancillary activities, it puts us behind in working towards a future run on renewables. The industry and our government say that natural gas is a clean-burning fuel.They say it’s a cheap fuel. Drilling and other activities are only cheap because subsidies exist; health and safety impacts aren’t figured into the price we pay when the natural gas is delivered to our homes.Some of the people most affected are children, the elderly, the chronically ill, and poor and minority communities. We pay for it one way or another.Google the Solutions Project to see what a 100 percent renewable energy mix would look like for New York and the 260,000 jobs that going renewable would create. Even Forbes magazine finds that solar energy employs more people in the United States than oil and gas combined. You can’t beat that.Florence CarnahanSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusTroopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopSchenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionslast_img read more

Developer comment: Serviced offices filling a gap

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Moss rolls out new company

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Investors go mad for it

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St Paul’s picked for £100m Yorkshire business park

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Lombok fisherman finds woman’s body in trash bag

first_imgResidents of Senggigi village in West Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, were shocked by the discovery of a woman’s corpse inside a trash bag on Thursday. The body was found by a villager who went fishing at 11 p.m. When he arrived at the fishing area around Jl. Alberto Senggigi, the man noticed a rotten stench, which prompted him to search for the source of the smell whereupon he found a black trash bag. “Based on other residents’ statements, the body was first found by a fisherman,” said Batulayar Military Post commander, Warrant Officer Muhammad Hilman, as quoted by Kompas.com on Thursday.  After locating the source of the foul smell, the fisherman asked other residents to inspect the contents of the bag. However, since no one had the courage to do so, the residents reported the discovery to the police.Upon closer examination, the police found that the trash bag contained a mutilated female corpse. They sent the body to Bhayangkara Hospital for an autopsy.Separately, West Lombok Police spokesman First Insp. I Ketut Sandiarsa confirmed the news. However, they have yet to carry out an investigation since they are still trying to determine the victim’s identity. (dpk) Topics :last_img read more

Sanders, Buttigieg in Iowa dead heat with 100 percent of results in

first_imgDemocratic presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders were neck and neck Thursday in the chaotic Iowa caucuses with 100 percent of precincts reporting but no winner declared following technical issues.The tally comes hours after the Democratic party chairman ordered a review of the results following technology problems that prevented a complete vote count in the United States’ first nominating contest Monday and some doubts were raised about the accuracy of the process.Sanders, the leftist senator from Vermont, and Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, are separated by a razor-thin margin in the final results, which come three days after the caucuses. Democratic Party chairman Tom Perez, however, stepped in earlier Thursday, demanding a review of the caucuses.”Enough is enough,” Perez said on Twitter. “In order to assure public confidence in the results, I am calling on the Iowa Democratic Party to immediately begin a recanvass.”Perez said it would involve an examination of the results from each caucus site rather than a full recount.With returns in from all of the 1,765 precincts in Iowa, Buttigieg was leading by 26.2 percent to Sanders’s 26.1 percent in the delegate totals.Massachusetts progressive Senator Elizabeth Warren was next with 18.0 percent followed by former vice president Joe Biden with 15.8 percent and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar with 12.3 percent.Topics :last_img read more

Australia says true coronavirus infections could be as high as 10 million cases

first_imgAs many as 10 million people globally may have been infected by the new coronavirus, Australia’s chief medical officer said on Friday, with the under-reporting due to a lack of testing in some countries for the highly contagious respiratory disease.A Reuters tally of official data on Friday pegged the number of COVID-19 cases caused by the virus at 1 million, but Australia’s chief medical officer said the true size of the global outbreak may be up to 10 times higher.”Worldwide we have passed 1 million infections. But we believe the true number is five or 10 times as much,” Brendan Murphy told reporters. Murphy said the mortality rates vary so much around the world that he believes many infections are going undetected.The World Health Organization has called on countries to significantly increase testing for coronavirus, while some critics have also highlighted differences in how some countries count coronvirus cases.China – where the outbreak began late last year – has only recently started counting asymptomatic cases of coronavirus, prompting criticism from some international experts.Without criticizing China or any other countries, Murphy said he did not trust any data beyond Australia’s.”The only numbers I have total faith in are the Australian numbers, frankly.” Topics :last_img read more

Coronavirus threatens to trigger new round of global food crisis: China official

first_imgThough China has sufficient grains to meet domestic demand, some other import-reliant farm products like soybeans and edible oils may be impacted by the global pandemic, Yu said.China’s exports of aquaculture, vegetables, and tea will be affected due to the disease, Yu added.Speaking at the same conference, Agriculture Minister Han Changfu ruled out a food crisis in China, saying it had the confidence and ability to secure supplies of grain and other major agricultural products.While the pace of domestic virus transmissions has slowed, China is focusing on infections from overseas arrivals as it guards against a major resurgence and monitors the spread in northeastern Heilongjiang province.”The risk of imported coronavirus is still huge and will put considerable pressure on livestock production,” Yu said.China is also fighting with the deadly African swine fever, which has slashed its pig herd by at least 40% and is still spreading. The country has reported 13 new cases of African swine fever since March.”African swine fever risks have significantly increased, as pig production recovery accelerates and more piglets and breeders get transported,” Yu said.China’s farmers, lured by good profits and a series of government policies, have sped up efforts to rebuild pig herd.Pests, drought and floods also present harsher threats than usual to output this year, Yu added. “If the epidemic continues to spread and escalate, the impact on international food trade and production will definitely worsen, and might trigger a new round of food crisis,” Yu said during a video conference on the country’s agriculture outlook.The pandemic and measures some countries took to secure domestic supplies have inhibited normal trade and supplies, and caused some major price fluctuations, Yu added.The coronavirus pandemic, which started in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year, has infected 2.3 million people and killed 159,000 people worldwide.Strict lockdowns and quarantines to control the coronavirus outbreaks have disrupted China’s supply chains and made it difficult for many industries to find enough workers, delayed poultry and pig production in the world’s top meats market. Topics :center_img The global coronavirus pandemic threatens to cause a huge shock to international food trade and trigger a new food crisis, a top agriculture official in China said on Monday.The comments came as coronavirus outbreaks roiled global agriculture supply chains and upended trade, and after some countries restricted exports of main grains and increased procurement for reserves.”The fast spreading global epidemic has brought huge uncertainty on international agriculture trade and markets,” said Yu Kangzhen, China’s deputy agriculture minister.last_img read more

‘Stop me if you need a doctor’: Yemen medic treats poor from his car

first_imgTopics : Hajj said he started giving free consultations via social media but then wanted to reach to those without access to such technology.”I thought about the poor and those in need on the streets who cannot get medical advice or don’t have the money for it,” he told AFP. Yemen is facing what the United Nations calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. A war between the government and Huthi rebels has killed tens of thousands and displaced four million people. Many Yemenis are afflicted by malnutrition and disease but the country’s healthcare system has all but collapsed, leaving it extremely vulnerable to the spread of the COVID-19 respiratory disease. In a war-ravaged country now battling coronavirus, one Yemeni doctor is dispensing medical advice from his car, gathering a large social media following along the way.”Stop me if you need a medical consultation,” reads a large sticker on the rear window of Sami Yahya al-Hajj’s four-wheel drive, alongside a cartoon figure of the bearded doctor wearing his square spectacles.As he offers diagnoses and prescriptions to the poor, the doctor’s phone chirps with messages and calls from patients who cough and splutter as they explain their ailments.center_img In the rebel-held capital of Sanaa, Hajj is flagged down by a man driving alongside his car.”My wife for the past week or two…” calls out the man, before Hajj asks him to pull over.  After a roadside consultation, Hajj prescribes a course of vitamins.”We doctors are on the frontlines of this current pandemic, and we must disseminate advice even outside medical facilities,” said Hajj, who has nearly 18,000 followers on Facebook.”We must safeguard and maintain the health of the poor, because their health is part of the whole community,” he said. Yemen’s government has officially recorded hundreds of coronavirus cases, including 112 deaths. But according to the United Nations, testing and reporting remain limited and it is likely that most areas in the country have been impacted. “Here is a Yemeni doctor treating the poor for free on the streets,” said one of Hajj’s supporters in a Facebook post hailing his “noble and beautiful” contribution.”I wish all Yemeni doctors would do the same in the current situation we are in.”last_img read more