Football Urban Meyer knew about allegations made against former wide receivers coach

OSU coaches Tony Alford (left) and Zach Smith stand together before the Buckeyes game against Rutgers on Oct. 1. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorA report made Wednesday by former ESPN reporter Brett McMurphy detailed domestic violence allegations made against former Ohio State wide receivers coach Zach Smith in both 2009 and 2015. The report suggests Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer knew about the allegations, something which he denied at Big Ten Media Days last week. The report showed pictures of the abuse of Courtney Smith, the ex-wife of Zach Smith, and included text messages exchanged between Courtney Smith and Shelley Meyer, Urban Meyer’s wife, which specifically discusses Zach Smith’s domestic abuse. “All the [coaches’] wives knew,” Courtney said to McMurphy. “They all did. Every single one.” Meyer said at Big Ten Media Days that he had no knowledge of a domestic violence incident in 2015, where Smith was investigated by the Powell Police Department, according to the report. According to the report, Zach Smith “took (Courtney) and shoved me up against the wall, with his hands around my neck,” something she said happened very often. McMurphy reported that in 2009, Courtney Smith was pressured by former Ohio State head coach Earle Bruce and special assistant Hiram DeFries to not press charges against Zach Smith after he was arrested by Gainesville Police after an alleged assault. Ohio State fired Zach Smith on July 23 after the domestic violence allegations became public and Courtney Smith filed a domestic protection order against him, which was filed on July 20 after Zach Smith appeared in Delaware County Municipal Court for criminal trespassing on July 18. The Ohio State football program could not be reached for comment. In a media advisory distributed on July 27, an Ohio State spokesman anticipated Meyer would next be available for comment on August 7. There has been no further update since then. read more

Decline in bees could wipe out British apple industry say scientists

first_imgFurther decline in bee populations could cost British farmers hundreds of millions of pounds and completely wipe out the apple industry, according to scientists.The authors of a major UN report warn that urgent action is needed to halt the decrease of pollinators, as many types of crop production would be commercially unviable without them. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Doing nothing is a big risk that could endanger the global supply of nutritious foods and the livelihoods of millions of peopleProfessor Simon Potts, University of Reading The report calls for “bee highways” to allow the insects to move more freely between foraging locations and reducing “green deserts” – landscapes dominated by a single crop species.Dr Tom Breeze, also from Reading, said the lion’s share of pollinating in the UK was performed by a small handful of species, which could be vulnerable to rapid population decline.“If things went wrong then people would certainly notice because we would have to import a lot more food and it would become more expensive,” he said.Published in the journal Nature, the report also found that £1.4 billion jobs worldwide depend on pollinating insects. Other produce such as rape, they argue, could not be nearly as efficiently grown without the help of bees, and an absence of the insects would load extra costs onto both shoppers and farmers.Pollinators are estimated to save British farms nearly £700 million a year, and the new report found that three-quarters of the world’s crops, worth £403 billion, rely on them.Professor Simon Potts from the University of Reading, who led the new research, said: “Doing nothing is a big risk that could endanger the global supply of nutritious foods and the livelihoods of millions of people.”last_img read more

Rare 50p pieces being sold for £200 do you have one

first_imgThe design features nine hands symbolising the then nine members of the Community, clasping one another “in a mutual gesture of trust, assistance and friendship”, according to the Royal Mint. Mr Clancy said a coin of limited mintage usually means that it will be popular with collectors and fetch a high price, but that some editions become unexpected success stories.Although the 2005 design to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Samuel Johnson’s dictionary had a mintage of more than 17,600,000, it has nevertheless been hoarded by collectors.The historian said the Royal Mint identifies which coins are being collected by sitting an employee in a room for several days and making him sift through a sample of 15,000 50p pieces from across the country.If the proportion of a certain edition found in the sample is less than expected, officials know it is being kept out of circulation.“It’s a question of mintage,” he said. Jemima Puddleduck, issued in 2016Credit:Royal Mint 2009 Kew Gardens Jemima Puddleduck, issued in 2016 If we see a drop of a particular coin in the surveys we know it’s become popularKevin Clancy, Royal Mint Museum Judo, from the 2011 Sporting Series released ahead of London 2012 Behind that, two 2016 coins featuring Beatrix Potter characters, one Jemima Puddleduck and the other Squirrel Nutkin, are the next hardest to come by.These coins are normally sold in bags of 20 on eBay for around £35, equating to £1.75 per coin.Other rare 50p coins include the Suffragettes and Battle of Hastings designs, which will fetch around £10 and £5, respectively. He explained that the relatively small number of Kew Gardens coins means they amount to around just 0.02 per cent of roughly 50 billion 50p pieces in circulation.After the offside rule edition, triathlon, judo and wrestling coins from the Olympic series are the third, fourth, and fifth rarest 50p coins, according to Change Checker, which developed the “scarcity index”. Judo, from the 2011 Sporting Series released ahead of London 2012 Rare 50p pieces are being sold online for more than £200 each, according to a new list which reveals the most scarce commemorative designs.A limited 2009 edition, minted to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, has now become so prized by collectors they are offering over 400 times its value for a single specimen.It tops a new leaderboard of specially commissioned 50p coins, demand for which has caused their value to rocket to several times the face value. Behind the Kew Gardens edition, which features a pagoda encircled by vines, designed by Royal Academy President Christopher Le Brun, the next most sought-after 50p is one of a series released ahead of the London Olympics explaining the offside rule in football.But, unlike the 2011 “Sporting Series”, of which more than 53 million coins were minted to publicise the games, just 210,000 Kew Gardens coins ever entered circulation.“It’s an attractive design, but it wasn’t intended to make it the most valuable, it just turned out that way,” said Kevin Clancy, Director of the Royal Mint Museum.“I think the Market finds its own way.” The 2009 Kew Gardens edition was designed by Christopher Le Brun of the Royal AcademyCredit:Royal Mint “We know some get lost or taken abroad, but if we see a drop of a particular coin in the surveys we know it’s become popular.”Outside sporting designs from the 2011 series, coins commemorating the Battle of Hastings, as well as the Battle of Britain and the composer Benjamin Britten make the Change Checker scarcity list.Number 33 on the list of 54 features a coin minted in 1973 celebrating Britain’s accession to the European Economic Community, of which nearly 90,000 were minted. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Tube passenger put in headlock and forced to apologise for being gay

first_imgA teenager was allegedly put in a headlock and forced to “apologise” for being gay in a homophobic attack on a Tube train.The 19-year-old man was strangled until he eventually did what his two attackers said because he was struggling to breathe, police claim.The man and his friends were wearing fancy dress for an event they were attending when they were approached by two youths on a Jubilee line train on a Saturday evening.The pair are alleged to have verbally abused the victim for being gay and became more aggressive when they were challenged.British Transport Police (BTP) claim they forced the man into a headlock, snatched his phone and threatened to stab him until he “apologised” for being gay. Although they returned the phone, the two youths – who had boarded the London Underground train at West Ham – then got into a fight with the man’s friends.A 25-year-old woman suffered bruising after being punched and pushed to the ground.The alleged victims left the west-bound train at North Greenwich after the attack, which happened at around 11.10pm on October 21. A man was abused, placed in a headlock and told to apologise for being gay in a homophobic assault on a Jubilee line train. Do you recognise these people? We’d like to speak to them in connection with the incident. Please text 61016 if you know them. https://t.co/Q8N1Cl67Uf pic.twitter.com/hYxAf0s0Ta— BTP London (@BTPLondon) December 4, 2017 North Greenwich London Underground station The force said in a statement: “Hate crime will not be tolerated by the British Transport Police. We believe everyone has the right to travel safely. The alleged victims left the Jubilee line London Underground train at North GreenwichCredit:DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS /AFPcenter_img BTP released images of the two men on Monday and urged anyone who recognises them to come forward. We won’t tolerate behaviour where someone is targeted because they are perceived to be differentBritish Transport Police “We won’t tolerate behaviour where someone is targeted because they are perceived to be different, or made to feel uncomfortable on their journey.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Should have gone to Specsavers branded car crashes into Liverpool lamppost

first_imgShould have gone to specsavers pic.twitter.com/iUJh7JwNxX— Tony Simons (@simons1878) January 16, 2018 Some joked that the driver of a Specsavers-branded car may need to pay a visit to the optician himself after it was seen crashed into a lamppost in Liverpool.The driver slammed into the pole with enough force to crush the bonnet after failing to see it in time.Liverpool City Council took a photograph of the accident and posted it on social media, appearing to see the funny side.The council wrote: “We’re ‘on sight’ fixing this street lamp on Menlove Avenue, which was damaged at lunchtime today. If you see any others, we’ll look into them… #shouldvegoneto.”Others on social media saw the strange scene and posted pictures with Specsavers jokes: We’re “on sight” fixing this street lamp on Menlove Avenue, which was damaged at lunchtime today. If you see any others, we’ll look into them… #shouldvegoneto pic.twitter.com/0u4U7XnLOx— Liverpool Council (@lpoolcouncil) January 16, 2018 The optician has been using the phrase “should’ve gone to Specsavers” since 2002. Despite some finding the sight amusing, the driver said she was “shaken” after the crash and had to go to hospital.She told the Liverpool Echo: “I’m used to hearing the phrase shouted out by kids, but I actually had to go to hospital after the crash, as I was so shaken.”Thankfully I’m fine now and safely back at home.”The optician said no one else was hurt in the crash. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Striking university lecturers warned they could be held liable for student failures

first_imgTeaching staff at more than 60 universities are due to begin a wave of walkouts if a bitter dispute over pensions is not resolved, affecting more than one million students. In emails seen by the Daily Telegraph, staff at both Reading University and City University, London, were told that by opting to take part in industrial action, due to start on Thursday, they could be liable for damages if students sue for breach of contract. The threats were likened to “bullying” by the University and College Union. Two universities have warned lecturers that if they go on strike they will be partly responsible for student failures and could face legal action. The scale of the strike action is understood…last_img

Poor children in Britain now fatter than wealthy in dramatic reversal

first_imgA group of children playing in the street, Powis Square, Notting Hill, London 1964Credit:UniversalImagesGroup  However the research also showed the difference in height between the poorest and richest has narrowed, with fewer disadvantaged children now of short stature. Researchers said there had been a major shift in eating and exercise habits  Children born after the war were raised on rations until 1954, and so had a diet high in vegetables and low in fat and sugar. Since then, the food environment has become increasingly obesogenic, with previously expensive treats becoming cheap and readily available. Dr David Bann, of the Centre for Longitudinal Studies at UCL, said: “Our findings illustrate a need for new effective policies to reduce obesity and its socioeconomic inequality in children in the UK – previous policies have not been adequate, and existing policies are unlikely to be either.“Without effective interventions, childhood BMI inequalities are likely to widen further throughout adulthood, leading to decades of adverse health and economic consequences.“Bold action is needed, such as creating further incentives for food manufacturers to reduce sugar and fat content in food and drinks, reduce the advertising of unhealthy foods to children and families, and incentivise the sale of healthier alternatives”.One in five children are now obese by the time they leave primary school and in some areas of the country nearly half of 11-year-olds weigh too much. Recent research from Public Health England (PHE) found that overweight and obese children are eating an extra 500 calories a day.To tackle the problem PHE is calling on food manufacturers to cut the number of calories in the foods most bought by families.The new study included data for more than 35,000 children born in England, Scotland and Wales from four longitudinal birth cohort studies beginning in 1946, 1958, 1970 and 2001 Poor children in Britain are now fatter than wealthy youngsters demonstrating a total reversal in the weight of the two social classes over the past 70 years.Traditionally, poverty has been associated with malnutrition and thinnness. But a new study by University College London, which compared children today to those born in the 1940s, 50s and 70s, has found a dramatic switch.In 1957, deprived 11-year-olds were on average 4.4lbs lighter than those from the upper classes as food shortages and gruelling lifestyles took their toll. But in 2015, the poorest children were 4.6lbs heavier than the richest.BMI (Body Mass Index) was also found to have risen among the most socially deprived teenagers. For children born in 2001, by the age of 15, there was a 1.4 kg/m2 difference between the classes, the highest ever recorded.In new research, published in the The Lancet Public Health, the authors said there had been considerable changes to diets and physical activity levels in Britain since the end of the Second World War.center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. In the 1946 cohort, the average 7-year-olds were one and a half inches (3.9cm) shorter than the least disadvantaged children in the 1946 cohort, whereas the difference in children in the 2001 cohort was just half an inch (1.2cm).Commenting on the new study,  Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, said: “The availability, quality and affordability of food is key to this research.“Though all children have grown in stature in the decades since the war, the end of rationing and simply more food enabled the poorest substantially to catch up in height.“The downside, however, is that their staple diet has become progressively worse in comparison with that of richer families and in an obesogenic society its density has stayed with them.“The researchers are quite correct to call for a sea change in our food composition if further obesity is to be avoided in deprived areas.” A group of children playing in the street, Powis Square, Notting Hill, London 1964 Researchers said there had been a major shift in eating and exercise habits Credit:Getty Images last_img read more

Harry Kane hails cancer patient 5 as inspiration and vows to beat Sweden

Hi Ben, I’ve seen your video and you are an inspiration. Carry on fighting and we’ll do everything we can on Saturday to keep a smile on your face! #BensWorldCup https://t.co/2Hgo3IC2lb— Harry Kane (@HKane) July 6, 2018 England captain Harry Kane has vowed to do “everything” to keep a young cancer patient smiling by beating Sweden in the World Cup.The Tottenham Hotspur star replied to a tweet by paediatric radiographer Liam Herbert, who shared a video of Ben Williams receiving a replica World Cup trophy.The five-year-old could not walk or talk before his treatment, but he asked for the World Cup as his speech returned while he was going through a course of radiotherapy for a brain tumour.Staff at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham then threw him a celebration to mark the end of his treatment in which he was presented with a certificate and the replica.Mr Herbert tweeted the video to Kane, urging him to also deliver the World Cup. To his surprise, the Three Lions star replied a day later, calling Ben an “inspiration”. In the video, the youngster, wearing an England shirt, unwrapped the trophy and held it close to him as a nurse helped him hold the “really heavy” replica.Ben’s father Sam Williams told The Independent: “Six weeks ago, Ben couldn’t talk or walk but we’ve essentially seen our little boy come back to us in the last few weeks. “They had already been absolutely wonderful, but what the staff in the radiology department did for him on his last day of treatment was just so special.”He really liked football before he got ill and has suddenly gone England crazy in the last couple of weeks, so much so that ‘England’ and ‘Harry Kane’ are some of the first words he learned to say again as his speech came back.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. England play Sweden in the World Cup quarter-final in Samara at 3pm UK time on Saturday. read more

Black and Asian parents are more ambitious in applying for good schools

Black and Asian parents are more ambitious in their attempts to get their children into good schools, a Cambridge University student has found.Only a minority of parents (39 per cent) choose their local school as their first option, the research showed, with white families more likely to put their local school as their top choice even if it is not particularly good.Meanwhile, Black or Asian children, or those who speak English as a second language, are on average more likely to apply to schools that are further away from where they live but have perform better academically.  Researchers from Cambridge and Bristol universities found that there is a “striking difference” between different ethnicities when it comes to school choice. They analysed the background characteristics of more than half a million children in England, and gave each secondary school in the country a score based on its how many students achieved at least five GCSEs with grades of A* to C.  Children from Asian families apply to schools that score seven percentage points on average more than schools that their peers from white families apply to, while those from black families apply to schools that score six percentage points more. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.  Professor Simon Burgess, one of the report’s authors, said: “We interpret this as being about ambition and an understanding that education and schools are a way to get on in life.  “You can’t always get into the school that you want.But Asian and black families are more likely to apply to the further away, better school, to try and get into a high quality school. White British families more likely to settle for the closer more mediocre school, and more likely to get in.” The research, published in the Oxford Review of Education, found that Black or Asian families or those who speak English as a second language also make more use of the school choice system.  41 per cent of White British households only make one choice, compared to 17 per cent of Asian households and 12 per cent of Black households.But despite making more choices, children who speak English as a second language have a lower chance of receiving an offer from their first-choice school which researchers say could be because they were picking more ambitious schools. read more

DDay veterans set sail for emotional return to Normandy 75 years after

Fusilier Doug Farrington is another veteran onboard MV Boudicca who since the war has never been back to France. Now 93, he is among the youngest on board as he was sent to fight in Operation Overlord underage (the oldest to make the journey this week is 101-years-old). “I’m hoping it will be a bit quieter this time round,” he says.Fusilier Farrington arrived on Gold Beach 19 days after D Day and was on the frontline as the Allies drove German forces back through Europe. “It was fighting all the way,” he says. “People were being killed all the time and you lost a lot of your friends.” As well as remembering fallen colleagues he is looking forward to seeing the French civilians again – who 75 years ago clasped his hand in gratitude.“Back then they were very grateful we gave them back our freedom,” he says. “And I was only too happy to do it.” Stressing the importance of remembering the events of the Second World War for future generations, he admitted this would in all likelihood be the last milestone anniversary which veterans would be able to attend in significant numbers. “I don’t think there will be enough of us around by the time it gets to the 80th anniversary,” he said. “This will be the final one.”Age may have diminished their numbers but it has not wearied them. Two female singers were serenading the new arrivals with wartime ditties and 97-year-old Joseph Weaver, a Yorkshireman who served in the Royal Artillery, dropped his bags and danced along to Vera Lynn’s White Cliffs of Dover.  Joseph Weaver, 97 has a dance prior to boarding Those reliving the journey this time prefer a simpler word: a pilgrimage, to honour those who never returned.The veterans arrived by coachload from across the country and as they prepared to board the Boudicca on Sunday were greeted by members of the Dover Sea Cadet band.Rear Admiral John Roberts, who during D Day was a sub-lieutenant aboard HMS Serapis and later became Captain of HMS Ark Royal, delivered a crisp salute before inspecting the teenage musicians who looked slightly terrified to be under the scrutiny of such a high ranking officer – albeit one now 95-years-old. When he set sail 75 years ago it was as part of the largest seaborne invasion in history; an armada of 7,000 ships so vast bystanders observed one could practically walk across the English Channel.On Sunday night as the sun dipped over the White Cliffs of Dover and MV Boudicca powered out across a glittering millpond sea, Fred Brunt found himself once more aboard a ship heading to the beaches of Northern France – for the very first time since D Day.“It’s hard to say why I’ve never been back,” says Brunt, who back on June 6, 1944 was a young able seaman and the coxswain of a landing craft transporting a tank on to Sword Beach during the first wave of Operation Overlord.“It will be an emotional journey. One thing I shall never forget is all the dead bodies. I’m looking forward to stepping out again on Sword Beach and will think of all those young men.”The 94-year-old Brunt is one of 255 Normandy veterans aboard the cruise ship MV Boudicca, which has been chartered by the Royal British Legion to sail between the D Day commemorative events over the week ahead.  On Wednesday MV Boudicca returns to Portsmouth for the national commemorative service attended by the Queen and US president Donald Trump. On Thursday the veterans will be back in France for the annual memorial service at Bayeux Cathedral in Normandy and adjoining war cemetery which contains 4,144 graves of Allied troops – among them Marine Leonard Waygood. Rod Stewart with D-Day veteran Leonard Williams 93, who served in Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, aboard the MV Boudicca  Prior to the evening departure Dame Vera, now 102, played a recorded message for those on board. “It will be nostalgic and sure to bring back lots of memories,” she said. “Rest assured we will never forget what you all did for us.” The Central Band of the Royal British Legion struck up on deck while Sir Rod Stewart, accompanied by his wife Penny Lancaster, also made a surprise appearance, serenading the veterans with Sailing before the ship departed.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Rod Stewart with D-Day veteran Leonard Williams 93, who served in Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, aboard the MV Boudicca Credit:PA/Hello! magazine A young Fred Brunt (left) The couple were involved with the 70th  anniversary of D Day and have remained in touch with some of the veterans, including Harold Bradley, who landed on Sword Beach on June 9, 1944, his 21st birthday.  Sir Rod described himself as “truly delighted to send our wonderful, brave soldiers off to the beaches of Normandy.” They came with their gleaming medals pinned proudly to their chests but, as ever, wearing their achievements lightly. Jim Docherty, 94, an able seaman aboard destroyer HMS Obedient during D Day only told his family five months ago he was involved in Operation Overlord and has never been back to France. “I wanted to come because there aren’t many of us left now I suppose, and that is a shame,” he said.On Monday the ship (which is being paid for out of fines from the Libor bank scandal) docks at Dunkirk – where in 1940 Allied troops were driven back by the Germans and planning for D Day begun in earnest. Veterans wave flags from the MV Boudicca as it leaves the port of Dover in Kent Addressing the nation during D Day King George VI described the mass sea and air assault to land more than 132,000 ground troops across five Normandy beaches as as “the great crusade”.  His good friend and fellow Royal Marine, Joseph Kelsey, 96, is making the journey onboard Boudicca to honour his memory.Kelsey joined up at 18 alongside Leonard Waygood and both men took part in the first wave of the invasion. Waygood was killed on the first day and Kelsey survived by a whisker.His landing craft was shelled by the Germans on the way in – killing several men on board – and another neighbouring craft took a direct hit. “I want to come back to remember my friend,” he says. “It is always very emotional to go back to the beaches.” Joseph Weaver, 97 has a dance prior to boarding Veterans wave flags from the MV Boudicca as it leaves the port of Dover in KentCredit:PA Rear Admiral John Roberts A young Fred Brunt (left) Rear Admiral John Roberts read more