Sachin Tendulkar, Helen named for Giants International Awards

first_imgCricket maestro and Bharat Ratna Sachin Tendulkar and Bollywood danseuse Helen are among this year’s Giants International awardees, according to an announcement here Tuesday.Tendulkar will get the award for lifetime achievement in sports while Helen Salim Khan will be honoured for her lifetime contribution to films.The awards shall be given away by the Bharatiya Janata Party President Amit Shah at a function Wednesday.Tendulkar will get the award for lifetime achievement in sports while Helen Salim Khan will be honoured for her lifetime contribution to films.The other awardees include Urvi Piramal (Business & Industry), Hemant Thacker (Medicine), Kulinkant Luthia (Social Service), Bahubali Shah (Journalism), Anu Malik (Music) and Patangrao Kadam (Education).Giants International was founded Sep 17, 1972 by Nana Chudasama who is now its world chairman, with a purpose to serve humanity, promote unity, harmony and homogeneity among its members.For the past 35 years, it has worked for family planning, disaster management, flood relief, rainwater harvesting, low-cost housing, AIDS, drugs abuse awareness, academics, medicine, environment and saving the girl child.According to Giants International Executive World Chairperson Shaina NC, the organisation has 600 branches in India and abroad in countries like the US, Britain, Africa, Ukraine and Mauritius.last_img read more

Charges withdrawn against paparazzo accused of 2015 Vancouver assault on Ryan Reynolds

first_img Login/Register With: Facebook Charges have been withdrawn against a paparazzo accused of assaulting actor Ryan Reynolds during the shooting of the first Deadpool film in Vancouver.Fifty-two-year-old Richmond, B.C. resident Richard Fedyck was arrested after allegedly hitting the actor with his car in the parking garage of the Shangri-La in 2015.Court services confirmed the withdrawal of the charges, but were unable to provide more details by Wednesday evening. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement READ MORE Twitterlast_img

Wabanaki Confederacy Were not dead our fires are still burning strong

first_img(Members of Wabanaki Confederacy build the Turtle Lodge Aug. 7, 2014 where the meetings were held in the Esgenoopetitj First Nation in New Brunswick over the weekend.)By Trina RoacheAPTN National NewsOld alliances looked to re-emerge at the Wabanaki Confederacy summer gathering over the weekend.Environmental concerns, Aboriginal title and forging a path away from the Indian Act were all on the agenda.Records date the Wabanaki Confederacy as far back as the 1680s.It was a political alliance between nations in the east, on both sides of what’s now the U.S-Canadian border. The Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, Mi’kmaq and Maliseet joined together against the threat of colonialism and raiding Iroquois.The purpose was peace.Over two decades ago, the Penobscot in Maine lit the sacred fires again and efforts were made to revive the traditional alliance.Gary Metallic is a Mi’kmaw Hereditary Chief from Listuguj. He says the focus of the Confederacy now is to “assert our ancestral jurisdictions because our roots go back further than the Indian Act system. Our roots go right into the ground, since time immemorial.”Metallic’s biggest concern is comprehensive land claims.He says the first issue is centred on who is sitting at the table. The advent of the Indian Act destroyed traditional forms of governance. Metallic calls current chief and councils an arm of the Indian Act and says Canada negotiating with bands today is the equivalent of Canada negotiating with itself.“(As for land claim agreements) we’re saying they’re illegal because we’re not at the table,” says Metallic. “Our people through their traditional governance systems need to be consulted first before any agreements are signed and people don’t know about these because most of the time it’s done behind closed doors.”Secondly, Metallic and others at the Confederacy say Canada has no right to negotiate deals for lands aboriginal people never ceded in the first place.Treaties vary across the country.The roughly seventy agreements with different First Nations took place over the course of three hundred years, mapping out Canada as it exists today. While some ceded land, others such as the Mi’kmaq’s Peace and Friendship treaties signed in the 1700s did not.Metallic says those treaties are strong because at that time the Mi’kmaq negotiated from a position of power; part of that due to the Wabanaki Confederacy.“For us these treaties were just about co-existence, how we lived together,” says.Metallic predicts a ripple effect from the recent Supreme Court ruling that awarded aboriginal title to the Tsilhqot’in Nation, adding, “that’s a big stick that’s been handed to us as traditional hereditary chiefs.”Aboriginal title is a hot topic in New Brunswick. SWN Resources Canada is exploring for shale gas. Worries that fracking will pollute the water table led to protests last summer and fall. The Mi’kmaq of Elsipogtog say instead of meaningful consultation, there were violent clashes with police, court injunctions and lawsuits filed by SWN Resources.Activist Willie Nolan and others filed a lawsuit of their own. In it, they say the shale gas giant, the Province of New Brunswick and Canada violated laws protecting the environment and Aboriginal rights. The Wabanaki Confederacy are interveners. Metallic says the suit asks the basic question, “Who owns this land? We never gave it up.”Hart Perley, a traditional Turtle Clanmother for the Maliseet Nation, says of the gathering, “The energy is so positive, so refreshing…It’s like uniting them and telling the world here we are. We’re here. We’re not dead, our fires are still burning strong.”The mood at the gathering is peaceful, punctuated with lots of laughter. People share ideas and food. A pot of moose stew doesn’t last long. But the purpose is serious.And daunting.“We each have our responsibility as nations to make sure our traditions are passed forward,” says Perley. “That our culture stays alive for future generations.”Perley says the most vital step is away from the Indian Act. She used to be a band councillor on the Tobique First Nation until she grew increasingly conflicted and left the position.Perley says there’s no real power for “Indian Act chiefs.” The true power for First Nations lies in the land she says.Her message to chiefs: “Come to your people. Stand with your people and we can help you get away from the Indian act because guess what? These are your natural resources. This is where you get your money for your programs and services in your communities.”Perley admits, it’s a hard step to take.The Indian Act is ingrained in an Aboriginal way of thinking.“Because of the oppression our people have been put through, they’re kind of stuck there. They don’t see a way out. Well, we’re offering them that. If they stick with our people they would be very strong chiefs,” she says.Tnohere’s funding for this group. No official recognition. Perley says they don’t need it.“The land belongs to all the nations as a collective,” she says.That’s the focus of the Wabanaki Confederacy.To reassert Aboriginal rights to the land. To revive traditional forms of government and to leave the Indian Act behind.troache@aptn.calast_img read more