CSEC PE Lecture: The importance of muscular flexibility

first_img freedom of movement Total range of motion around a joint is highly specific and varies from one joint to another (hip, trunk, shoulder), as well as from one individual to another. Muscular flexibility relates primarily to genetic factors and to physical activity. Beyond that, factors such as joint structure, ligaments, tendons, muscles, skin, tissue injury, fat, body temperature, age and sex influence range of motion around a joint. The range of motion about a given joint depends mostly on the structure of that joint. Greater range of motion, however, can be attained through plastic and elastic elongation. Plastic elongation is the permanent lengthening of soft tissue. This is best attained through slow, sustained stretching exercises. Joint capsules, ligaments and tendons are non-elastic. However, they can undergo plastic elongation. Elastic elongation is the temporary lengthening of soft tissue. Muscle tissue has elastic properties and respond to stretching exercises by undergoing elastic or temporary lengthening, thus increasing the extensibility of the muscles. Changes in muscle temperature can increase or decrease flexibility. Properly warmed individuals have better flexibility. Cool temperature has the opposite effect, impeding range of motion. The amount of adipose tissue (fat) around joints and muscle tissues will increase resistance to movement, and the added bulk also hampers joint mobility because of the contact between body surfaces. On average, women have more flexibility than men and seem to retain this advantage throughout life. The two most significant contributors to lower flexibility levels are sedentary lifestyles and lack of physical activity. Factors Affecting Flexibility Flexibility is defined as the ability of a joint to move freely through its full range of motion. Health-care professionals and practitioners generally have underestimated and overlooked the contribution of good muscular flexibility to overall fitness and preventative health care. Most people who exercise do not take the time to stretch, and those who do stretch don’t always do it properly. Many muscular/skeletal problems and injuries experienced by individuals today are related to a lack of flexibility. In daily life, we often have to make rapid or strenuous movements we are not accustomed to making. A tight muscle that is abruptly forced beyond its normal range of motion often leads to injuries. A decline in flexibility can cause poor posture and subsequent aches and pain that leads to limited and painful joint movement. According to a recent article, approximately 80 per cent of all low back problems stem from improper alignment of the vertebral column and pelvic girdle, which is a direct result of inflexible and weak muscle. Improving and maintaining good range of motion in the joints enhances the quality of life. Good flexibility promotes healthy muscles and joints. Improving elasticity of muscles and connective tissues around joints enhances freedom of movement and the individual ability to participate in all types of activities. Taking part in a regular stretching programme also increases resistance to muscle injury and soreness, prevents low back and other spinal column problems, improves and maintains good postural alignment, promotes proper and graceful body movement, improves personal appearance and self-image and helps to develop and maintain motor skills throughout life. In addition, flexibility exercises have been used successfully to treat dysmenorrheal (painful menstruation) and general neuromuscular tension (stress). Regular stretching helps decrease the aches and pains caused by psychological stress and contributes to a decrease in anxiety, blood pressure and breathing rate. Furthermore, stretching exercises, in conjunction with calisthenics, are helpful in warm-up routines to prepare for vigorous aerobics or strength-training exercises, as well as in cool-down routines following exercise to facilitate the return to a normal resting state. Fatigue muscles tend to contract to a shorter-than-average resting length and stretching exercises help fatigue muscles re-establish their normal resting length. Similar to muscular strength, good range of motion is critical in older life. Because of decreased flexibility, older adults lose mobility and are unable to perform simple daily task such as bending forward or turning. Many older adults do not turn their head or rotate their trunk to look over their shoulder but, rather, must step around 90 to 180 degrees to see behind them. Physical activity and exercise can also be hampered severely by lack of good range of motion. Because of the pain during physical activity, older people who have tight hip flexor muscles cannot jog or walk very far. This condition usually worsens with further inactivity. A simple stretching programme can alleviate or prevent this problem.last_img read more

Arunachal has tremendous scope in adventure sports: Khandu

first_imgItanagar, Sep 30 (PTI) Arunachal Pradesh has tremendous scope and potential in aero, aqua and land adventure sports to make it a leading adventure tourism destination of the world, Chief Minister Pema Khandu said today.The chief minister called for creation of skilled manpower to promote this untapped sector.Khandu had a meeting with Colonel Gulshan Chadha, Principal of National Institute of Mountaineering & Allied Sports (NIMAS), located at Dirang in West Kameng district of the state.He asked Col Chadha to train manpower with specialisation in adventure sports, an official release said.”The more specialised human resource we develop, better are opportunities to attract adventure enthusiasts from all over the world,” Khandu observed.Col Chadha had called on the chief minister here to submit the annual administrative report of the institute.The chief minister assured him that the state government was committed to provide every possible platform to attract tourists so that people of the state are gainfully employed and economic activities get a fillip. PTI UPL SUS DIP PSlast_img read more

Ashes 2017: Joe Root reacts to Ricky Ponting calling him ‘little boy’

first_imgJoe Root hit back at former Australian captain Ricky Ponting for calling him a “little boy” after England succumbed to a humiliating Ashes defeat against Australia after the first three Tests of the series.England were no match to Australia and failed to put up any substantial fight as Australia trounced by an innings and 41 runs in the third Test in Perth to claim back the urn.England will now be playing for pride as Australia look to inflict further pain upon their rivals in the form of a series whitewash when they take on each other in the fourth Test in Melbourne , starting December 26.”He’s entitled to his opinion, but he doesn’t spend any time in our dressing room or around the squad,” Root was quoted as saying by Sky Sports.”I’m obviously going to disagree with that — I’m sure if you asked any of the guys in the camp, the coaches or support staff or players, they would back me up on that,” Root added.Ricky Ponting called Root “soft and a “little boy” after England’s loss in the Perth Test.”The way he answered a lot of the questions after the game last week seemed almost like a little boy,” said Ponting.”You need to be more than that as a leader, especially when things aren’t going well. It just looks like it has been a little bit soft.”The right-handed batsman, who has scored 5,499 runs for England in Test cricket at an average of 52.37, also said the “little boy” tag does not go with him and he knows what he can do on the field.advertisement”I don’t think I go about things as a ‘little boy’, for sure,” he added. “I have my own way of doing things — I think it’s important you don’t try to be something you’re not,” the top-order batsman said.”I know there are occasions where you might have to be quite strong in front of the group. I may not appear to do that out on the field but there are certainly times when I know that I can do that, and I have done that,” Root added.(With inputs from IANS)last_img read more