Report: Immigration reaches record high

first_imgWASHINGTON – The number of immigrants in the United States reached a new high this year after the biggest five-year increase in American history, according to a study released Monday by the Center for Immigration Studies. Nearly 7.9 million immigrants – about half of them believed to be illegal – settled in the U.S. between January 2000 and 2005, boosting the total number of immigrants in the nation to 35.1 million, the study said. About 1.8 million immigrants during that period entered California, more than any other state, according to the study by the D.C.-based think tank that favors immigration control and analyzed Census Bureau data. The report comes as the House prepares to pass Republican legislation reinforcing U.S. borders, easing deportations and creating a nationwide system whereby employers must check workers’ immigration status. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals And providing ammunition to both sides armed for an immigration showdown in Congress this week, the study found that immigrants in California and across the nation are more likely to receive public assistance than their American-born counterparts. The study said nearly half of all California households receiving food stamps, subsidized housing or other public assistance are headed by an immigrant. And it said immigrants and their children in California are twice as likely to be uninsured, with more than half of all immigrants in the state receiving Medicaid. Nationally, the study found, 28.6 percent of immigrant households use a welfare program compared to 18.2 percent of U.S.-born households, while 47 percent of all immigrants are either uninsured or have insurance provided through Medicaid. “Legalization will probably not solve the problem of welfare use or low income associated with illegal immigration,” wrote Steven Camarota, the center’s director of research and author of the report. “In fact, with regard to welfare use, legalization will almost certainly make the problem worse,” he wrote. Democrats and immigration advocates had mixed reactions. Rep. Howard Berman, D-Van Nuys, who is at the forefront of trying to enact a guest-worker program and plans to try to attach one to the legislation this week, said he is concerned by high numbers of legal immigrants using public assistance. “I don’t think we should bring people into this country to go on the welfare system,” Berman said. As for illegal immigrants’ affect on public systems, he said, “There’s no doubt illegal immigration has an impact on health services. It’s disruptive. It costs money.” Reshma Shamasunder, director of the California Immigrant Welfare Collaborative, pointed out that while higher numbers of immigrants may receive public assistance, they get less from the system than Americans. At the same time, she said, they contribute more in Social Security and other taxes. The average U.S.-born Californian receives $1,212 annually from public assistance programs while non-citizens receive $474, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Meanwhile, Shamasunder said, the average immigrant-headed household in the state contributes $2,679 to Social Security, about $530 more than the average U.S.-born household. “You’re really talking about a highly productive and employed population. These are not people who are sitting at home waiting to get welfare,” she said. “Immigrant or not, there is no easy access to health care. There’s other parts of our system that are broken, and it has nothing to do with whether a person is an immigrant or not.” Camarota noted in the report that high rates of uninsured and use of public assistance “is not caused by an unwillingness to work,” particularly among illegal immigrants. But, he said, “The use of welfare programs by immigrants does raise the question of why we have an immigration policy that admits so many individuals who are not self-sufficient.” The report also found that more immigrants lack high school educations than native-born American adults. One of the largest gaps is in California, where four times as many immigrants as natives are high school dropouts. “This huge gap has enormous implications for the social and economic integration of immigrants, because there is no single better predictor of one’s economic and social status in modern America than education,” Camerota noted. Rep. Gary Miller, R-Diamond Bar, said he does not believe legal immigrants should receive public assistance. “You should not have a system where people come here from another country and benefit from current American taxpayers.”— Lisa Friedman, (202) 662-8731 lisa.friedman@langnews.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Resource Discovery: US Army Educational & Development Intervention Services Newsletters

first_imgU.S. Army Educational & Developmental Intervention Services [Keeping In Touch Newsletters]Did you know that the U.S. Army’s EDIS offers CE credit for reading their Keeping In Touch (KIT) newsletters? These publications are available online and are full of valuable information for providers.The newsletters discuss a theme for a series of months at the end of which readers can take a CE exam online. Upon successful completion of the exam, a non-discipline specific certificate of continuing education contact hours will be provided. Individuals will need to check with their credentialing agency regarding the viability of these credits within their state and/or system.Some of the past topics have been: Early Childhood Mental Health, Autism and the Role of Early Interventionists, Dual Language Learners in Early Intervention, Cultural Competence, and Understanding Depression. You can access the newsletters and archived CE exams by clicking, here.Each newsletters consists of four sections surrounding a theme:A resource article in which a summary of a journal article is providedAn evaluation of data on the topicA consultation corner where experts in the field respond to topic-related questionsA review of a web-based resource that is helpful for providersTo access the newsletters,  click here.We hope that you will find this to be a useful resource.This post was written by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

Anti-Money Laundering, Terrorism Financing Safeguards under Financial Inclusion Strategy

first_img Bank of Jamaica (BOJ) Governor, Brian Wynter, says proposed safeguards against money laundering and terrorism financing are among notable developments emerging under the Government’s National Financial Inclusion Strategy (NFIS), since its launch in March 2017. The strategy is an ambitious portfolio of project activities designed to empower Jamaicans financially, through improved access to financial information and products tailored to meet their needs. Story Highlights Bank of Jamaica (BOJ) Governor, Brian Wynter, says proposed safeguards against money laundering and terrorism financing are among notable developments emerging under the Government’s National Financial Inclusion Strategy (NFIS), since its launch in March 2017.The strategy is an ambitious portfolio of project activities designed to empower Jamaicans financially, through improved access to financial information and products tailored to meet their needs.Speaking at a recent NFIS forum at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel in St. Andrew, Mr. Wynter said the policy proposals, including enhanced ‘Know Your Customer (KYC) requirements, seek to institute a risk-based framework for the Government’s Anti-Money Laundering/Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) Programme.This, he said, will ensure that “our system is not hospitable to crimes of money laundering and financing terrorism”.Mr. Wynter, who heads the Financial Inclusion Steering Committee, which is coordinating implementation of the strategy, pointed out that the risk-based framework will enable persons who have been excluded or are underserved by the financial system, “merely because, for example, they may lack a formal proof of address”, to use financial products available in Jamaica.“Small things can have enormous consequences in the lives of Jamaicans… and [these] policy proposals, once adapted into the anti-money laundering framework… [are] aimed at, at least, helping us to remove [the obstacles] so that access is not impeded for the excluded and underserved,” he contended.Mr. Wynter said another notable engagement under the NFIS, is development of the National Financial Literacy Action Plan and Interim Strategy by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, which, he pointed out, “promises to be a very important programme”.Meanwhile, the Governor advised that the BOJ is designing new reporting forms to capture vital information on the extent of private-sector credit being provided to micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs).The value of loans disbursed to MSMEs by deposit-taking institutions as a percentage of total private-sector credit, is among the NFIS’s impact indicators.Information on this indicator in the NFIS’s annual report for 2017 shows no out-turn reflected for 2016, and 0.015 per cent for 2017, based on data collated between March and December of that year.The target is for an increase in the percentage of total private-sector credit extended to MSMEs to 12 by 2020.Mr. Wynter said the BOJ’s lack of “good data” on this area has “adversely impacted our ability to accurately measure what progress we are making towards being a more inclusive society”.He indicated that work is ongoing to improve the data-gathering processes for MSMEs, “having regard to the new definitions (of MSMEs) under the new National MSME Policy”.Meanwhile, Mr. Wynter has reaffirmed the BOJ’s “strong” commitment to ensuring the NFIS’s success.He said the Bank has commenced the process of communicating the NFIS’s goals and objectives to various interests, and assured that the institution will undertake other engagements, which “find us going to our fellow citizens, hearing their concerns and tailoring our policy responses based on their needs”.A National Financial Inclusion Council, chaired by Finance and the Public Service Minister, Dr. the Hon. Nigel Clarke, has been established to oversee the implementation of the NFIS.The Council has fostered a public-private partnership through a Stakeholder Advisory Group chaired by Jamaica National Group’s Chief Executive Officer, Earl Jarrett. Speaking at a recent NFIS forum at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel in St. Andrew, Mr. Wynter said the policy proposals, including enhanced ‘Know Your Customer (KYC) requirements, seek to institute a risk-based framework for the Government’s Anti-Money Laundering/Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) Programme.last_img read more