Indonesia reports another H5N1 death

first_imgAug 16, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – For the second time in 4 days, Indonesia’s health ministry today announced a fatal human case of H5N1 avian influenza, this one in a 17-year-old girl from a town just west of Jakarta who died Aug 14.The World Health Organization (WHO), in a statement confirming the case, reported the girl got sick on Aug 9, was hospitalized Aug 13, and died a day later. She was from Tangerang, 12 miles west of Jakarta, in Banten province.Investigators are working to determine how the girl was exposed to the virus, the WHO said. Her death pushes Indonesia’s H5N1 case count to 104 and its death toll to 83.Joko Suyono, a health ministry spokesman, said tests from two local laboratories confirmed the girl was infected with the H5N1 virus, the Associated Press reported today.The last previous H5N1 victim in Indonesia was a 29-year-old woman from the resort island of Bali who died Aug 12 after she had contact with sick and dead chickens. The WHO reported that the woman’s 3-year-old daughter had died of a respiratory illness before her mother fell ill, but health officials did not suspect she had an H5N1 infection.The WHO’s global H5N1 case count now stands at 321 cases and 194 deaths, including 58 cases and 36 deaths this year.See also:Aug 16 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2007_08_16/en/index.htmllast_img read more

CDC Loosens Restrictions for Isolating Essential Workers

first_imgThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) made a move on Wednesday afternoon that many had expected.CDC Director Robert Redfield announced that the agency has new guidance for essential workers. That replaces previous guidance that had asked workers to isolate for 14 days if they were exposed to someone who is infected with COVID-19.The new guidance allows many employees in essential fields of work, such as healthcare, policing, and food supply, to continue working even if they have have come in contact with someone who has coronavirus.Workers in the aforementioned fields are now asked to:-Pre-screen: Employers should measure the employee’s temperature and assess symptoms prior to the person starting work. Ideally, temperature checks should happen before the individual enters the facility.-Regular monitoring: As long as the employee does not have a temperature or symptoms, they should self-monitor under the supervision of their employer’s occupational health program.-Wear a mask: The employee should wear a face mask at all times while in the workplace for 14 days after last exposure. Employers may issue face masks, or they can approve employees’ supplied cloth face coverings in the event of shortages.-Social distance: The employee should maintain six feet of space and practice social distancing as work duties permit.-Disinfect and clean work spaces: Clean and disinfect all areas such as offices, bathrooms, common areas, shared electronic equipment frequently.“A potential exposure means being a household contact or having close contact within 6 feet of an individual with confirmed or suspected COVID-19,” the CDC said. “The timeframe for having contact with an individual includes the period of time of 48 hours before the individual became symptomatic.”Dr. Deborah Birx, who serves as the White House’s Coronavirus Response Coordinator, explained the change by saying, “It looks at degree of exposure and really making it clear that exposure occurs within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes, so really understanding where you shouldn’t be within 6 feet of people right now.”She continued, “But if you’re in a work situation where you have to be, there will be a series of recommendations that if you had had a significant exposure of what specifically to do, and if you’ve had a less exposure what to do.”CDC May Loosen Guidelines for Some Exposed to COVID-19last_img read more