Aaron Wan-Bissaka divides family in Arsenal vs Man U clash

first_imgAaron Wan-Bissaka will put family loyalties to one side when Manchester United kick off 2020 with a trip to Arsenal. Wan-Bissaka grew up in a family of Arsenal fans and his father revealed he even used to call the now United right-back Thierry Henry when he was younger. But Wan-Bissaka will be aiming to get one over the Gunners and boost United’s top-four hopes at the Emirates following his £50m summer move to Old Trafford. ‘What’s more important, Arsenal winning or me playing well?’ Wan-Bissaka asked his dad Ambroise in a video released by his sponsors Adidas ahead of the New Year’s Day clash. Ambroise said: ‘You playing well because I like you, game by game, to improve and play well, not for Arsenal to win.’ ‘Good answer,’ Wan-Bissaka, 22, said. His older brother Kevin admitted: ‘See when you play against Arsenal, it’s going to be a sticky one for me. I’d take a draw.’Advertisement Promoted ContentTop 10 Tiniest Phones Ever MadeThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreDid You Know There’s A Black Hole In The Milky Way?6 Amazing Shows From The 90s That Need A Reboot Right Now8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do This7 Train Stations In The World You Wish To Stay At LongerBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top6 Great Ancient Mysteries Of ChinaWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?6 Best ’90s Action Movies To Watch Today FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… ‘I’m going for a win all the way,’ Wan-Bissaka said. Aaron Wan-Bissaka and family how will the clash pan out on New Year day Explaining the family ties with Arsenal, Ambroise said: ‘We have been supporting Arsenal since we saw Thierry Henry and how good he was. ‘When we came to this country, Thierry Henry was good and everyone knew Thierry Henry at that time. When Aaron was growing up, I would call him Thierry Henry. When we supported Arsenal games we must all sit down and watch.’ Wan-Bissaka missed United’s 1-1 draw against Arsenal in October so he is in line to face them for the first time since his big move from Crystal Palace on Wednesday. He has been of United’s standout performers this season and his importance underlined when he was rested for Saturday’s trip to Burnley partly to avoid the possibility of getting a fifth booking that would have ruled him out of the Arsenal trip. Read Also ‘Ronaldo,Messi Have Scored More Goals Than Man Utd This Decade’ United’s 2-0 victory at Burnley lifted Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side up to fifth and they start the new year four points behind fourth-placed Chelsea.last_img read more

Blue Jays put big-hitting Bichette on IL with strained knee

first_img WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News The Toronto Blue Jays put shortstop Bo Bichette on the injured list Sunday, a day after he strained his right knee in a suspended game against the Tampa Bay Rays.Play resumed in the fourth inning without Bichette. Manager Charlie Montoyo said Bichette hurt himself while stretching before an at-bat and undergoing testing, including an MRI.Bichette is batting .361, second-best in the American League. He entered Sunday fifth in the league in slugging (.672) and OPS (1.063).For Sunday’s regularly scheduled game, he was replaced on the roster by infielder Santiago Espinal. Brandon Drury started the game at shortstop. Last Updated: 17th August, 2020 10:46 IST Blue Jays Put Big-hitting Bichette On IL With Strained Knee The Toronto Blue Jays put shortstop Bo Bichette on the injured list Sunday, a day after he strained his right knee in a suspended game against the Tampa Bay Rays. SUBSCRIBE TO US FOLLOW UScenter_img COMMENT LIVE TV First Published: 17th August, 2020 10:46 IST Written Bylast_img read more

NHL Draft 2019: Devils select Jack Hughes No. 1 overall

first_imgThe Devils got their man.In an unsurprising move, New Jersey took United States National Team Development Program center Jack Hughes with the first-overall pick in the NHL Draft on Friday. Hughes, 18, scored 34 goals and added 78 assists for the NTDP this year.He broke the NTPD’s career scoring record and averaged more than two points per game this season. He was widely seen as a surefire No. 1 pick and should be a cornerstone for any team in the middle for years to come.The only question about the top selection was whether the Devils would go rogue and take Finland winger Kaapo Kakko instead. He jumped up draft boards over the second half of the season and really came into the spotlight when he scored five goals in the first two games of the IIHF World Championships in May.Kakko helped a relatively star-powerless Finland squad to a championship and had some people asking if he could overtake Hughes as the No. 1 prospect. Hughes has been the top prospect in the draft before the season even started.When his brother, Quinn, was taken No. 7 overall in 2018, Hughes became the focus. And there is good reason for this. Related News Potential No. 1 pick Jack Hughes added to USA World Championships rostercenter_img Top prospect Kaapo Kakko will not participate in NHL combine In fact, NHL.com actually did rank him above Hughes. And in all honesty, the Devils couldn’t have gone wrong by taking either young man.Ultimately they selected Hughes and likely will have a great player for years to come as will the Rangers if, and when, they take Kakko at No. 2.last_img read more

Report reveals record Premier League club profits

first_img0Shares0000Premier League wages rose across the league by nine percent to a new record of £2.5 billion last season, according to a report by Deloitte © AFP/File / Glyn KIRKLONDON, United Kingdom, Apr 20 – English Premier League clubs enjoyed record profits last season, according to a report published Friday by financial consultants Deloitte.The report said the Premier League made a collective pre-tax profit of £0.5 billion ($0.7 billion, 0.57 billion euros) almost three times the previous record of £0.2 billion in 2013/14. With strong broadcast revenues and Financial Fair Play rules keeping wages in check to a degree, England’s top-flight clubs also posted a record operating profit — total revenues minus wages and other costs, apart from transfer fees, – of £1 billion, double the figure for the previous season.Wages, however, did rise across the league by nine percent to a new record of £2.5 billion but overall revenue rose 25 percent.Dan Jones, the head of Deloitte’s Sports Business Group, said the revenue increase was a result of last season being the first of a three-year domestic broadcasting deal with BT and Sky worth more than £5.1 billion.Jones added the increase in wages was “nowhere near the level of revenue growth” and this “reflects both the extent of (the Premier League’s) financial advantage over other leagues and the impact of domestic and European cost control measures”.Although the league has had difficulties in selling the next set of domestic broadcast rights this year, Jones forecast that clubs, who have made collective pre-tax profits in three of the last four years, would continue to record impressive financial figures.Manchester City, which currently leads the English Premier League, spent more than any other European football club to assemble its current squad © AFP / Paul DEFOSSEUX“Despite the lack of growth in domestic broadcast deals announced to date, we still expect to see overall revenue growth in the coming seasons, and if this is complemented with prudent cost control, we expect that pre-tax profits will be achieved for the foreseeable future,” he explained.The above figures do not include transfer costs, which for accounting purposes are spread over the length of a player’s contract.Transfer fees are continuing to rise worldwide but Deloitte are confident the Premier League is well-placed to continue to compete with the likes of Italy’s Serie A and Spain’s La Liga for leading players, with a number of top footballers likely to be looking for new clubs after the World Cup in Russia in June and July.“We have already seen some clubs utilising their significant revenue increases, with a record £1.9 billion spent on transfers in the 2017/18 season,” said Tim Bridge, a senior Deloitte consultant.“We may again see similar levels of spending in the coming season, with the World Cup providing the perfect shop window for talent, but expenditure remains well within the means of clubs.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Half-time: Fulham 0 Norwich 2

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesScott Malone conceded two penalties in the first half to leave Fulham in trouble at the break.Graham Dorrans converted both spot-kicks after Malone first brought down Jacob Murphy and was later adjudged to have pulled Cameron Jerome to the ground.However, Fulham hotly contested the second decision, with Malone and skipper Scott Parker both booked in the aftermath.Norwich had twice gone close from corners, while at the other end Sone Aluko’s effort was tipped behind by Canaries keeper Michael McGovern.Malone’s first transgression came on 16 minutes, his foul on Murphy giving Dorrans the chance to open the scoring, and six minutes before half-time he was penalised again as Norwich doubled their lead.Fulham had a few half chances but were too often crowded out inside the box, although Chris Martin directed the ball on to the outside of the post. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Darwinists Rattle Sabers Against I.D.

first_imgHas there ever been a controversy among scientists more acrimonious than the current one over intelligent design?  It seems all the big science Goliaths are determined to eradicate intelligent design from the earth, yet the I.D. Davids are standing their ground.  “History is written by the victors,” wrote Henry Gee in Nature this week (see 02/23/2006 story); though stated in an unrelated context, his proverb fits here as well: “This is as true for our account of evolution as it is for purely human affairs.”  Here are some examples of the bellicose rhetoric emanating from scientific institutions:Support our troops:  Nigel Williams in Current Biology this week1 said, “Evolutionary biologists in the US got a little early seasonal cheer in December with a detailed and comprehensive attack on the increasingly widespread notion of intelligent design.”  Though he repeated the caution that it is far from over, he called Judge Jones’ decision “a coruscating attack on the intelligent design case.”  Calling Darwin’s ideas of evolution “rock solid,” Williams was surprised that so many British disbelieved his views, as shown by a recent poll (01/26/2006).  Williams repeated common criticisms about ID, that it is religiously motivated, a right-wing American phenomenon, and if successful, would bring science to a halt.Political science:  Nature2 praised Al Gore’s new global-warming documentary, and took note of Randy Olson’s advice in Flock of Dodos that the evolutionists need to beef up their public relations (see 02/17/2006).Medical emergency:  Donald Kennedy in Science,3 accompanied by some evolutionary friends, called doctors to the fray.  “Medicine needs evolution,” he said.  Stressing the positive, they said, “training in evolutionary thinking can help both biomedical researchers and clinicians ask useful questions that they might not otherwise pose.”  On the negative, evolutionary training can help biomedical researchers “understand that both the human body and its pathogens are not perfectly designed machines but evolving biological systems shaped by selection under the constraints of tradeoffs that produce specific compromises and vulnerabilities.”  Examples: lower back pain in humans, wisdom teeth, narrowness of the birth canal, etc.  “There is growing recognition that cough, fever, and diarrhea are useful responses shaped by natural selection,” he claimed.Das Boot:  Constance Holden reported with an air of triumph in Science4 that Ohio “booted out” ID.  She quoted evolution supporters who called the decision to remove a “creationist-inspired” sentence allowing for criticism of evolution a “stunning victory.”  The article included a political cartoon of a Trojan Horse in the shape of a Panda, referencing the suggested alternative textbook, Of Pandas and People.  She discounted the surveys that show strong public support for ID, quoting a professor who touted, “anyone can play the survey game” because another poll found 84% of respondents had never heard of ID (although the poll noted by the Discovery Institute was not about ID, but about whether criticisms of evolutionary theory should be allowed; see 02/15/2006).  In an editorial in the Cincinnati Inquirer, Roddy Bullock regretted that Ohio had “turned back the clock” on intelligent design, thus granting Darwinism state protection as a dogma to be believed, not merely learned.All the Bias That’s Fit to Print:  Evolution News has had several entries this week criticizing the New York Times for continuing to misrepresent ID even when they have been repeatedly corrected by the Discovery Institute.Sunday School for Anti-ID Warriors:  Science Daily reported on the recent AAAS Sunday conference for educators on how to deal with creationism and intelligent design (see 02/20/2006).  “Evolution on the Front Line” also produced a strong statement on the teaching of evolution and opposition to intelligent design (see AAAS website, PDF) taking its cue from Judge John Jones’ ruling that ID is religion, not science.  It stressed that there is “no significant controversy within the scientific community about the validity of the theory of evolution.”  The soldiers are all in uniform and lined up in straight ranks.    The AAAS also posted a press release about the event, showing Animal Planet star Jeff Corwin at the podium and giving prominent place to Vatican astronomer George Coyne who called creationists “a plague in our midst.”  The release has a link to audio and powerpoint files from the meetings.Not Backing Down:  The Discovery Institute, despite all this criticism, announced that its list of scientists encouraging criticisms of Darwinism has swelled to over 500 (see also World Net Daily story).  Discovery Institute has opened a new website to post the names: www.dissentfromdarwin.org.  Given the climate, each signatory has taken somewhat of a career risk to become associated with the statement, “We are skeptical of claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the complexity of life.  Careful examination of the evidence for Darwinian theory should be encouraged.” 1Nigel Williams, “Growing challenge of Darwin’s detractors,” Current Biology, Volume 16, Issue 4, 21 February 2006, Pages R107-R108, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2006.02.015.2News, “Grizzlies, dodos and Gore put science on film,” Nature 439, 902 (23 February 2006) | doi:10.1038/439902a.3Randolph M. Nesse, Stephen C. Stearns and Donald Kennedy, “Editorial: Medicine Needs Evolution,” Science, 24 February 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5764, p. 1071, DOI: 10.1126/science.1125956.4Constance Holden, “Ohio School Board Boots Out ID,” Science, 24 February 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5764, p. 1083, DOI: 10.1126/science.311.5764.1083.What if they held a war, and nobody came?  The elitist science institutions are increasingly out of touch with reality, let alone American culture.  A huge undercurrent of American sentiment finds Darwinism unconvincing and wants it to be open to critical examination.  They also find arguments for ID compelling.  Nevertheless, mirroring the coastal blue states that surround a vast red-state middle America, you will notice that the same journals that trash ID praise political liberals (Al Gore), and never have anything good to say about political conservatives (George W. Bush).  They love religious liberals who capitulate 100% to Darwinism (see 02/11/2006) but hate religious conservatives who think the Bible might actually have something worthwhile to say.  These scientific elitists tend to congregate in government-funded institutions rather than for-profit businesses.  They occupy the campuses where Democrats outnumber Republicans 20 to 1, where Political Correctness rules allow Marxist radicals to gain tenure and a platform to trash America with reckless abandon while conservatives (or even moderates) must guard their every word, like Larry Summers who was finally ousted from the presidency of Harvard this week (see Ben Shapiro epitaph).    As shown many times here, this is not a battle of science vs. faith.  We all have the same scientific evidence.  It is understandable that religious conservatives would be attracted to intelligent design, because they already believe in a Designer.  But the pro-Darwinians project themselves as unbiased, religiously-neutral, scholarly lovers of truth who were led to their position merely by the preponderance of evidence (but compare the next two entries).  Why, then, are they almost uniformly political liberals and far leftists? (see Michael Fumento column).    The same battle went on in the 19th century in Britain.  At about the time a consensus on “science” was firming up, and the word “scientist” became a new title taken up by what had been “natural philosophers,” similar political forces opposed one another.  The battle lines became drawn between younger, anti-establishment types in the British Association and the older, more conservative natural theologians in the universities.  The BAAS tended toward mechanical philosophy that viewed the universe as a machine governed by laws, as opposed to the romantic science championed by Schelling and Goethe that viewed nature as an organism of which humans were intertwined.  Ironically, the mechanists viewed man as an evolved animal, but tended to discuss science as if objective, outside observers.    The human dynamics of the 19th century battles are instructive.  At about the same time, science became a career, and large institutions took shape.  In many respects, the ones who gained control of the institutions and journals were the liberal, radical followers of the likes of Darwin, Tyndall and Huxley.  It was not that their science was better than that of Maxwell, Faraday, Sedgwick, Agassiz, Pasteur and other “people of faith” (whatever that vapid phrase means).  Darwin’s “people of froth” managed to steer a movement that had the presumptive authority of “science” toward the acquisition of power for those who were predominantly liberal and anti-establishment.    This complex history should not be oversimplified, but it underscores the fact that science is inescapably a human enterprise.  It is not purely an objective process of gathering facts toward unbiased conclusions.  Philosophy and politics are inextricably involved, and the more removed from the observable and testable, the more the worldview of the practitioner matters.  Nothing in science could be more worldview-laden than the origin and meaning of life.  Should the mechanists and materialists have the final word on such important subjects?  What if one party were to gain control of the centers of power and manage to ostracize the competition?  Is that not what has happened?  “History is written by the victors,” Henry Gee reminded us.  It is the duty of all fair-minded and knowledgeable observers to ensure that the Darwin Party, which usurped power in the late 19th and 20th centuries, does not succeed in their ongoing efforts to write their critics out of the history books and shut off all accountability for their disreputable shenanigans.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

London Olympics 2012: Krishna Poonia crosses the 63m barrier

first_imgIndia’s top discus thrower Krishna Poonia gave herself something to cheer about ahead of the Olympics as she crossed the 63 metres mark in the Woodford Green Open Graded Meeting organised by the Woodford Green and Essex Ladies Athletics Club at Ashton Playing Field ground here.Krishna, who had won the Commonwealth Games gold, registered 63.16 metres during the event here Tuesday. Krishna hoped she could cross the 65m barrier during the Games.Her husband and coach Virender was also happy with the result.”Today’s throws show we are on track to deliver peak results during the Olympic Games. Hitting big distance in the opening rounds is essential to remain in contention and that’s what Krishna achieved today with 63m opener,” said Virender.But Poonia still has a long way to go as her fellow competitors have gone well above the 65 metres mark.Germany’s Nadine Muller, favourite to win the gold in London and a silver medallist at last year’s World Championships, best this season is 68.89 metres. Besides Nadine, Cuba’s Yarelys Barrios (68.03 metres) has the second best distance while China’s Yanfeng Li (65.85 metres) and Jian Tan (64.90 metres) have also produced better marks than Poonia.last_img read more

10 months agoChelsea manager Sarri: Italy must do more to eradicate racism

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Chelsea manager Sarri: Italy must do more to eradicate racismby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea manager Maurizio Sarri has called on Italy to fix their racism problem following the alleged racist abuse of Napoli defender Kalidou Koulibaly at the San Siro.Koulibaly alleged received the abuse during Wednesday’s loss to Inter Milan, before being sent off after two quick yellow cards.Sarri sympathises with his former player and wants his homeland to do more to fix the problem.”You know in Italy there are some problems in football, especially for Naples,” Sarri said.”When I was there we stopped two matches; one against Lazio in Rome, one against Sampdoria in Genoa.”I’m really very sorry for Kalidou because he is a wonderful man. I’m sorry for him, but I think in Italy we can do something more for this problem.” last_img read more

10 months agoPhilippe Sandler delighted with Man City debut

first_imgPhilippe Sandler delighted with Man City debutby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the lovePhilippe Sandler was delighted to make his debut for Manchester City in yesterday’s FA Cup win over Rotherham.The Dutch defender, who was played at centre-half, featured as a second-half substitute for the 7-0 thumping.Sandler said, “I always play there. Honestly, I have never been in the midfield. Why now? I stood there during the training session. Sending passes. Since I’ve been here, I try to develop as a central defender. “Vincent Kompany helps me enormously. I learn a lot from him. “I do not know if I will get another chance again soon. I especially want to be completely fit first.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

a month ago​Brighton midfielder Stephens: I’ve never played in a team like this

first_img​Brighton midfielder Stephens: I’ve never played in a team like thisby Ansser Sadiqa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton midfielder Dale Stephens admits that he has never played on a team with such quality.The Albion have gone through a change in style this summer, with manager Graham Potter favouring a possession based, attacking game plan.And Stephens admits that having so much of the ball in games is a change for him, given the way his teams have usually played throughout his career.Asked by reporters if he has played in such a team before, Stephens responded by saying:”No, honestly not.”It’s the first time I have played in a system that probably suits me better, I would say.”It probably suits the players and individuals we have at the club at the minute.”Everyone is enjoying playing in a team that is dominating possession.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more