Lecturer examines international law

first_imgBrigham Young University (BYU) law professor David H. Moore gave a lecture focused on the relationship between international law and its domestic enforcement in the United States at the Eck Hall of Law on Thursday, sponsored by the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy.Moore said there is a fundamental conflict between two concepts: the effectiveness of international law and the integrity of proper domestic governance.“In my opinion, the Supreme Court is trying to accommodate both concerns in their decisions,” Moore said.According to Moore, the primary sources of international law are treaties, which are formal legal agreements between nations, and customary international law, which consists of non-binding conventions that countries traditionally follow. Illustrating this distinction with an example, Moore said diplomatic immunity existed as a informal mutual agreement between countries before it was codified into law with formal treaties.Moore then explained the principle of self-execution. International law that is ratified by the U.S. must include a provision that specifies in what way it should be enforced to fulfill the standard of self-execution. Otherwise, Moore said, international law cannot be enforced in the U.S., absent of authorization from a branch of government.“However, a broad notion of non-self-execution violates the Supremacy Clause [of the Constitution],” Moore said. “This is because the Supremacy Clause states that formally ratified treaties must be treated as the law of the land.”Moore said the case of Medellin v. Texas demonstrates the principle of non-self-execution. Medellin, a convicted Mexican national on death row, appealed his conviction because Texas legal authorities failed to allow him to contact the Mexican consulate in accordance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. The Supreme Court sided with Texas and decided that international treaties are not applicable to domestic law unless Congress implements an enforcement statute or the treaties include self-executing provisions.“There are two basic views on relationship between customary international law and federal common law,” Moore said.The modern position believes international law can be enforced to a large extent by the courts while the revisionist camp argues it can only be enforced as authorized by Congress or the executive branch.Moore referenced the case of Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain to show how the Supreme Court interprets these two views. The case involved a suspected cartel member who had been abducted to face murder charges by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. The court held that an abducted foreign national could face prosecution, but the act of kidnapping itself might be a violation of international law and thus provide grounds for civil litigation under the Alien Tort Statute.“Most scholars see the court’s decision as a victory for the modern view, but I think they confuse two questions: whether Alien Tort Statute creates a cause of action and whether customary international law is federal common law in the absence of political branch intent,” Moore said.In fact, Moore said the court’s analysis actually endorses the revisionist position with its focus on Congressional intent and concern with separation of powers.“Academic commentary is out of step,” Moore said. “Incorporation [of international law] through the political branches is the appropriate direction.”Tags: David H. Moore, domestic governance, international law, Lawlast_img read more

Florida man buys Lamborghini with $3.9 million from federal coronavirus loans

first_imgHines was arrested Friday after he was involved in a hit-and-run accident on July 11. Miami police impounded his car; prosecutors plan to seize it, according to the Herald. Hines faces charges of fraud. He was granted a $100,000 bond and will be allowed to stay at his mother’s home with a GPS monitor. Hines’ also used some of the money on dating website accounts, jewelry and clothing expenditures as well as reservations at high-end Miami Beach hotels such as the Fontainebleau and Setai, the Herald reported.The newspaper reported an investigation into Hines found he applied for an SBA loan of $13.5 million through Bank of America for his four South Florida moving business, claiming it would be spent on his 70 employees with a payroll of $4 million. Bank of America approved $3,984,557. However, authorities found Hines’ companies monthly revenue and expenses averages about $200,000. A Florida man has been arrested on bank fraud charges after prosecutors say, he used federal COVID-19 loans to buy a bright blue Lamborghini Huracan Evo.29-year-old David T. Hines of Miami received nearly $4 million in coronavirus federal loans to assist employees affected by the coronavirus, according to a report by the Miami Herald.His first purchase? A Lamborghini which costs $318,497. However, reports say the purchase was not on the list of permissible items under the Small Business Administration loan program.last_img read more

Darwinists Rattle Sabers Against I.D.

first_imgHas there ever been a controversy among scientists more acrimonious than the current one over intelligent design?  It seems all the big science Goliaths are determined to eradicate intelligent design from the earth, yet the I.D. Davids are standing their ground.  “History is written by the victors,” wrote Henry Gee in Nature this week (see 02/23/2006 story); though stated in an unrelated context, his proverb fits here as well: “This is as true for our account of evolution as it is for purely human affairs.”  Here are some examples of the bellicose rhetoric emanating from scientific institutions:Support our troops:  Nigel Williams in Current Biology this week1 said, “Evolutionary biologists in the US got a little early seasonal cheer in December with a detailed and comprehensive attack on the increasingly widespread notion of intelligent design.”  Though he repeated the caution that it is far from over, he called Judge Jones’ decision “a coruscating attack on the intelligent design case.”  Calling Darwin’s ideas of evolution “rock solid,” Williams was surprised that so many British disbelieved his views, as shown by a recent poll (01/26/2006).  Williams repeated common criticisms about ID, that it is religiously motivated, a right-wing American phenomenon, and if successful, would bring science to a halt.Political science:  Nature2 praised Al Gore’s new global-warming documentary, and took note of Randy Olson’s advice in Flock of Dodos that the evolutionists need to beef up their public relations (see 02/17/2006).Medical emergency:  Donald Kennedy in Science,3 accompanied by some evolutionary friends, called doctors to the fray.  “Medicine needs evolution,” he said.  Stressing the positive, they said, “training in evolutionary thinking can help both biomedical researchers and clinicians ask useful questions that they might not otherwise pose.”  On the negative, evolutionary training can help biomedical researchers “understand that both the human body and its pathogens are not perfectly designed machines but evolving biological systems shaped by selection under the constraints of tradeoffs that produce specific compromises and vulnerabilities.”  Examples: lower back pain in humans, wisdom teeth, narrowness of the birth canal, etc.  “There is growing recognition that cough, fever, and diarrhea are useful responses shaped by natural selection,” he claimed.Das Boot:  Constance Holden reported with an air of triumph in Science4 that Ohio “booted out” ID.  She quoted evolution supporters who called the decision to remove a “creationist-inspired” sentence allowing for criticism of evolution a “stunning victory.”  The article included a political cartoon of a Trojan Horse in the shape of a Panda, referencing the suggested alternative textbook, Of Pandas and People.  She discounted the surveys that show strong public support for ID, quoting a professor who touted, “anyone can play the survey game” because another poll found 84% of respondents had never heard of ID (although the poll noted by the Discovery Institute was not about ID, but about whether criticisms of evolutionary theory should be allowed; see 02/15/2006).  In an editorial in the Cincinnati Inquirer, Roddy Bullock regretted that Ohio had “turned back the clock” on intelligent design, thus granting Darwinism state protection as a dogma to be believed, not merely learned.All the Bias That’s Fit to Print:  Evolution News has had several entries this week criticizing the New York Times for continuing to misrepresent ID even when they have been repeatedly corrected by the Discovery Institute.Sunday School for Anti-ID Warriors:  Science Daily reported on the recent AAAS Sunday conference for educators on how to deal with creationism and intelligent design (see 02/20/2006).  “Evolution on the Front Line” also produced a strong statement on the teaching of evolution and opposition to intelligent design (see AAAS website, PDF) taking its cue from Judge John Jones’ ruling that ID is religion, not science.  It stressed that there is “no significant controversy within the scientific community about the validity of the theory of evolution.”  The soldiers are all in uniform and lined up in straight ranks.    The AAAS also posted a press release about the event, showing Animal Planet star Jeff Corwin at the podium and giving prominent place to Vatican astronomer George Coyne who called creationists “a plague in our midst.”  The release has a link to audio and powerpoint files from the meetings.Not Backing Down:  The Discovery Institute, despite all this criticism, announced that its list of scientists encouraging criticisms of Darwinism has swelled to over 500 (see also World Net Daily story).  Discovery Institute has opened a new website to post the names: www.dissentfromdarwin.org.  Given the climate, each signatory has taken somewhat of a career risk to become associated with the statement, “We are skeptical of claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the complexity of life.  Careful examination of the evidence for Darwinian theory should be encouraged.” 1Nigel Williams, “Growing challenge of Darwin’s detractors,” Current Biology, Volume 16, Issue 4, 21 February 2006, Pages R107-R108, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2006.02.015.2News, “Grizzlies, dodos and Gore put science on film,” Nature 439, 902 (23 February 2006) | doi:10.1038/439902a.3Randolph M. Nesse, Stephen C. Stearns and Donald Kennedy, “Editorial: Medicine Needs Evolution,” Science, 24 February 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5764, p. 1071, DOI: 10.1126/science.1125956.4Constance Holden, “Ohio School Board Boots Out ID,” Science, 24 February 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5764, p. 1083, DOI: 10.1126/science.311.5764.1083.What if they held a war, and nobody came?  The elitist science institutions are increasingly out of touch with reality, let alone American culture.  A huge undercurrent of American sentiment finds Darwinism unconvincing and wants it to be open to critical examination.  They also find arguments for ID compelling.  Nevertheless, mirroring the coastal blue states that surround a vast red-state middle America, you will notice that the same journals that trash ID praise political liberals (Al Gore), and never have anything good to say about political conservatives (George W. Bush).  They love religious liberals who capitulate 100% to Darwinism (see 02/11/2006) but hate religious conservatives who think the Bible might actually have something worthwhile to say.  These scientific elitists tend to congregate in government-funded institutions rather than for-profit businesses.  They occupy the campuses where Democrats outnumber Republicans 20 to 1, where Political Correctness rules allow Marxist radicals to gain tenure and a platform to trash America with reckless abandon while conservatives (or even moderates) must guard their every word, like Larry Summers who was finally ousted from the presidency of Harvard this week (see Ben Shapiro epitaph).    As shown many times here, this is not a battle of science vs. faith.  We all have the same scientific evidence.  It is understandable that religious conservatives would be attracted to intelligent design, because they already believe in a Designer.  But the pro-Darwinians project themselves as unbiased, religiously-neutral, scholarly lovers of truth who were led to their position merely by the preponderance of evidence (but compare the next two entries).  Why, then, are they almost uniformly political liberals and far leftists? (see Michael Fumento column).    The same battle went on in the 19th century in Britain.  At about the time a consensus on “science” was firming up, and the word “scientist” became a new title taken up by what had been “natural philosophers,” similar political forces opposed one another.  The battle lines became drawn between younger, anti-establishment types in the British Association and the older, more conservative natural theologians in the universities.  The BAAS tended toward mechanical philosophy that viewed the universe as a machine governed by laws, as opposed to the romantic science championed by Schelling and Goethe that viewed nature as an organism of which humans were intertwined.  Ironically, the mechanists viewed man as an evolved animal, but tended to discuss science as if objective, outside observers.    The human dynamics of the 19th century battles are instructive.  At about the same time, science became a career, and large institutions took shape.  In many respects, the ones who gained control of the institutions and journals were the liberal, radical followers of the likes of Darwin, Tyndall and Huxley.  It was not that their science was better than that of Maxwell, Faraday, Sedgwick, Agassiz, Pasteur and other “people of faith” (whatever that vapid phrase means).  Darwin’s “people of froth” managed to steer a movement that had the presumptive authority of “science” toward the acquisition of power for those who were predominantly liberal and anti-establishment.    This complex history should not be oversimplified, but it underscores the fact that science is inescapably a human enterprise.  It is not purely an objective process of gathering facts toward unbiased conclusions.  Philosophy and politics are inextricably involved, and the more removed from the observable and testable, the more the worldview of the practitioner matters.  Nothing in science could be more worldview-laden than the origin and meaning of life.  Should the mechanists and materialists have the final word on such important subjects?  What if one party were to gain control of the centers of power and manage to ostracize the competition?  Is that not what has happened?  “History is written by the victors,” Henry Gee reminded us.  It is the duty of all fair-minded and knowledgeable observers to ensure that the Darwin Party, which usurped power in the late 19th and 20th centuries, does not succeed in their ongoing efforts to write their critics out of the history books and shut off all accountability for their disreputable shenanigans.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Chinese Girl under the hammer

first_imgThe Chinese Girl, with her blue skin and red lips, is one of the most widely reproduced artworks of the 20th century.(Image: Bonhams) The artist in his heyday, surrounded by some of his paintings.(Image: Tretchikoff)MEDIA CONTACTS • Julian RoupBonhams, London+44 20 7468 8259Janine ErasmusThe celebrated Tretchikoff painting Chinese Girl is to go on auction in London on 20 March, but before that the pop culture classic will be exhibited in Johannesburg and New York.The artwork, of an oriental woman with a strange hue to her skin, is said to be the self-taught Tretchikoff’s most recognisable painting, and one that has been reproduced, according to some sources, more often than the Mona Lisa. It’s also known as the Green Lady or the Blue Lady – depending on the quality of the print.Bidding will start at US$471 000 (R4.3-million), says auction house Bonhams, and the painting is expected to bring in as much as $785 000 (R7.1-million). The sale is part of a yearly auction of South African art and will include a special focus on works by William Kentridge.At the 2012 South African sale, held in March, sculptures by Anton van Wouw and Edoardo Villa as well as paintings by Irma Stern, Cecil Skotnes, Walter Battiss and Pierneef, among others, sold for thousands and in some cases, millions of rands. Tretchikoff’s Fighting Zebras changed hands for $92 400 (R838 000).Bonhams also reports that in October 2012, at part two of the South African sale, Tretchikoff’s Portrait of Lenka fetched a new artist’s world record price of $530 000 (R4.8-million). Lenka was Tretchikoff’s muse during World War Two, and he painted her several times.Tretchikoff sold the original Chinese Girl to an American woman during a tour of the US, and it has remained in the family ever since. According to Bonhams, the buyer’s granddaughter is now putting the painting up for auction.The painting will be on view at Johannesburg’s Everard Read Gallery on 23, 25 and 26 February before it’s shipped to London.Mysterious ladyIn a 2011 interview in the South African version of Marie Claire magazine, the identity of the mysterious woman, a puzzle that had art lovers scratching their heads for decades, was revealed. She is Monika Pon, now resident on Gauteng’s East Rand, but in those days she was Monika Sing-Lee and she lived in Cape Town.In 1950, she was just 17 when she encountered the artist in her uncle’s laundromat in the suburb of Sea Point. Tretchikoff asked her to pose for him and some 15 of his pupils at his studio in the inner-city suburb of Gardens.But the young woman didn’t appreciate the significance of the opportunity because, as she said, “he wasn’t famous”. That would only happen during the 1960s and 1970s, when prints of the Chinese Girl began to appear in living rooms, restaurants and on memorabilia all over the world.There are actually two versions of the Chinese Girl – in the well-known one Sing-Lee wears a vibrant gold-coloured tunic and in the lesser-known version she wears a subdued blue top. She was paid the equivalent of $2.2 (R20) for effort.Russian author Boris Gorelik has also made the pilgrimage to visit the subject of what has been described as the world’s most reproduced artwork. Gorelik’s book Incredible Tretchikoff is scheduled for publication in 2013, and he travelled from Moscow to Johannesburg to interview Sing-Lee for the book.The Russian admits in a local newspaper article, published in mid-2011, that he was sceptical at first, but when Sing-Lee opened an album to show him photos of herself that were taken around that time, his doubts vanished.“The girl in the black-and-white snapshots from the fifties was just like the legendary image come to life,” he wrote. “Only, she smiled most of the time and didn’t have that turquoise tint to her face. The visual similarity couldn’t be clearer.”Gorelik maintains that Chinese Girl prints in top condition can bring in hundreds. However, the outrageous Tretchikoff was once widely reviled for the perceived tackiness of his paintings, which lacked subtlety and taste according to the critics, although he always insisted that he was a serious artist.But over the last two decades the art world has had a change of heart and today the pieces are highly sought-after.From Russia to South AfricaVladimir Griegorievich Tretchikoff was born in 1913 in Petropavlovsk, an industrial city in today’s Kazakhstan, into a wealthy family of landowners. He was the youngest of six boys and two girls. In 1917 Russian workers rose up against the Tsarist regime and the family fled to avoid the revolution. They settled in Harbin in Manchuria, northern China.The young Tretchikoff showed a natural artistic talent early on, and soon he was painting backdrops at the Russian opera house in that city. He later moved to Shanghai and worked there until 1934 as a cartoonist at the Shanghai Evening Post.Tretchikoff married a fellow Russian ex-pat and the couple moved to Singapore, where his career continued to develop – until the city was invaded by Japanese forces in 1941. His wife and daughter were evacuated to an unknown destination, and he was captured by the Japanese and spent the rest of the war first in a prison camp in Serang, Java, and later, on parole in Jakarta after he had proved his claim that he was an artist.After the war he was reunited with his wife and child, with the help of the Red Cross – the two had settled in South Africa and the country was to be his home from then on. He held his first solo exhibition in 1943 in the Maskew Miller art gallery, and became the darling of the local art community who liked his disdain of his critics. It wasn’t long before the US, Canada and the UK were also caught up in Tretchi-mania.But still the art critics remained unconvinced, until the late 1990s when Tretchikoff’s paintings started to fetch impressive sums at auction. Sotheby’s in South Africa raised $10 000 for the Zulu Maiden in 1999 while Fruits of Bali fetched a whopping $410 000 (R3.7-million) in Cape Town in 2008. The trend is expected to continue with Chinese Girl.Tretchikoff died in a frail care home in 2006, aged 92, after suffering a stroke a few years before. The Tretchikoff Trust was established in 2008 and keeps his legacy alive by encouraging South Africa’s youngsters to pursue their artistic dreams.last_img read more

Breathe Easy With Balanced Ventilation

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Houses need fresh air. Without ventilation, the quality of indoor air can rapidly become worse than that of the outside air; that holds true even in urban areas. Common contaminants include gases, odors, and moisture, and these can stem from utility rooms, garages, basements, bathrooms, and kitchens.Until recently, fresh air entered a typical house through various openings, whether intentional (a fan or open window) or unintentional (holes and leaks around windows, rim joists, door jambs, and sheathing penetrations). Over the last few decades, however, houses have become tighter, and the unintentional flow of air through the building envelope has been reduced. Once a house reaches about five air changes per hour (ACH), it’s important to start thinking about using mechanical ventilation to ensure indoor-air quality.In regions with moderate to significant heating and/or cooling loads, HRVs and ERVs are the most efficient means of mechanical ventilation. Depending on the efficiency of the heat exchanger, it can transfer anywhere from 50% to 91% of the conditioned air’s heat and energy to the supply air.Homeowner satisfaction with a recovery ventilator will depend on the answers to three questions: Does it keep the air temperature comfortable? Is it cheap to operate? Is it excessively noisy? Does it keep the air temperature comfortable? Comfort speaks to a unit’s thermal efficiency. Thermal efficiency is the recovery ventilator’s ability to transfer the temperature of the outgoing air to the incoming air. When a unit transfers a high percentage of the heat or cold to the incoming air, the fresh air can be diffused directly into the living space without creating cold drafts in the winter and warm eddies of air in the summer.To compare the effects of efficiency on indoor-air temperature, let’s say the indoor temperature… This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberscenter_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more

Beware of Holiday Frauds

first_imgPhoto by karenwarfel via Pixabay.com CC0 Public DomainBy Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, [email protected] families are a frequent target for holiday scams. With the holiday season in full swing, so are various frauds associated with it. Frauds tend to follow current events whether they are natural disasters like hurricanes, floods, and tornados or seasonal events like income taxes and end-of-year holidays. Unfortunately, the holidays can bring out the worst, as well as the best, in people as thieves, both in person and online, steal victims’ money and/or identity.Below are some common holiday scams to caution service members about:Online ScamsBeware of e-mails asking you to provide personal information to receive a package. These are often phishing schemes to obtain personal identification information (PII) to commit identity theft. Don’t click on links from unknown sources.Beware of “too good to be true” sales offers for relatively inexpensive high-end goods and electronics that request personal identification information. Fake retailer websites, may send shoddy merchandise or nothing at all and steal victims’ PII.Beware of phony web sites with “off” logos and spelling and grammar mistakes and sales offers that require wire payment.Use an application like Norton SafeWeb to warn you about unsafe websites.Look for contact information on retail websites. For example, a phone number and physical location rather than a PO box or sole e-mail address. Another indicator of a reputable retailer is a “Terms and Conditions” link for return policies.Beware of offers for “too good to be true” holiday season travel. The accommodations that are offered may be substandard or non-existent. Always deal with reputable travel agents and tour package providers.Make sure that online orders are secure by looking for https:// in the website URL of an online merchant.Postal ScamBeware of postcards for “undeliverable” packages. Some of these scams request PII or are a ploy to make expensive phone calls. For example, callers may be directed to the “hotbed” fraudulent area codes of 284, 809, and 876 in the Caribbean.ShoppingUse a credit, instead of a debit card, for large purchases. Not only can you receive rewards, but the credit card company may be able to reverse charges for shoddy or damaged goods. With a debit card, check, or cash, your money is gone.Carry a minimum amount of cash, plastic, and personal information when shopping or traveling during the holidays and make sure that your wallet or purse is secure at all times and not left unattended (e.g., on the back of a chair).Charitable DonationsNever provide donations and/or credit card information to telephone charitable solicitations. Some are outright scams and many have such high administrative expenses that very little money actually goes to the charitable cause.Donate money only to charities you know that are registered with the IRS. Check their 990 form at GuideStar.Beware of phony charities that sound like legitimate ones (e.g., National Cancer Society instead of American Cancer Society).Beware of phony charities that make highly emotional appeals for disabled police, firefighters, and military veterans.Package DeliveryAvoid having unattended packages left for delivery on your doorstep. Some criminals actually follow delivery trucks to steal victims’ holiday packages.Require a signature for package delivery. If no one is at home, request that the package be given to a trusted neighbor or held at the nearest package pick-up depot.Gift CardsInspect gift cards before you buy them to make sure that they have not been tampered with (e.g., having the activation code scratched off). Thieves who steal these codes can often use a gift card before the rightful owner.Buy gift cards that are kept behind a store counter or near the cash register so clerks can keep an eye on them to discourage tampering.Get a gift card receipt for each gift card that you buy and include the receipt with gift cards as proof of activation and payment so recipients can obtain a replacement, if necessary.last_img read more

Yusuf Mannan pays ode to Burma teak

first_imgMannan’s line of library furniture looks like colourful waves on the wallAllium sativum, better known as garlic, is a mundane kitchen essential. But Bangladesh-based designer Yusuf Mannan has put a new spin on the staple with his Lehsoon range of lamps, which mirror the shape of their namesake. The lampshades,,Mannan’s line of library furniture looks like colourful waves on the wallAllium sativum, better known as garlic, is a mundane kitchen essential. But Bangladesh-based designer Yusuf Mannan has put a new spin on the staple with his Lehsoon range of lamps, which mirror the shape of their namesake. The lampshades, fashioned out of translucent fabric, mimic the delicate garlic casing while the pedestal is a roughly-hewn piece of teak wood.The Lehsoon lamps are fashioned from fabric and teakThe National Institute of Design (NID) graduate’s other muses are equally eclectic. He claims to be inspired by the Shakers, an 18th century religious group founded in England, local Gujarati artisans called kakas and even charming doll’s houses. Inevitably, this 33-year-old’s creations reflect his varied influences while celebrating individuality and technique.Mannan believes that beauty and functionality go hand in hand. As a result, his line of furniture and lifestyle products bear the unmistakable stamp of originality while addressing practical concerns. The designer’s miniature collection is made out of salvaged scraps of woodThough imaginative, the young designer likes to steer clear of over-the-top ornamentation. Instead, he loves to play around with natural textures and shapes while crafting his products.At his Dhaka studio, you can browse through the Mangrove Collection which sings paeans to untreated wood. The series is noted for its spartan chairs, tables and recliners with grainy, unpolished surfaces. “I am mostly inspired by the natural world. When in doubt, I try and draw parallels from nature to come up with a solution,” he says by way of explanation.Despite possessing a bare-bones aesthetic, all his furniture pieces exude personality. And yes, his designs are a far cry from heavily-embellished items that populate most urban living spaces. “A lot of my recent creations take inspiration from Shaker furniture that rarely sported elaborate details,” says the maverick.Over his decade long career, Mannan has worked with sundry materials but it is wood that ticks all his design checkboxes. “My first and only love is wood, Burma teak to be more specific. It has beautiful grains, the sweetest fragrance and is very forgiving too,” he explains.Reconfiguring familiar shapes is Mannan’s forte. So his Library Collection has curved racks in vibrant tones instead of conventional straight-lined shelves. Cocking a snook at tradition, the designer has also come up with a miniature line of furniture with thumb-sized beds, tables and dressers that are just right for a doll’s house. “I salvaged scraps of wood and set out to make miniatures. At that scale you really begin to understand the material better and when you revert to actual scale, you start being more precise,” he elaborates on his style, adding that his next step would be to make entire dollhouses, down to the last little detail.The Time Tree installation, made for Wipro, combines wires and clocksNo stranger to the world of unorthodox shapes and proportions, Mannan has a unique way of functioning. He barely sketches on paper anymore. When an idea strikes, he rushes to his workshop, starts drawing on a piece of wood and eventually executes the design. All his creations are handcrafted and retailed through his website.But this avant-garde designer, who employs traditional wood-crafting techniques in new ways, also has a knack for fashioning thematic interiors. He started a firm called Bent by Design in 2007 with Hidish Salam, a furniture designer from Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology, and T.When an idea strikes Mannan, he executes the design without drawing on paperKuldeep, another alumnus from NID. Since then, the trio has worked on different platforms of design. But the jewel in the label’s crown is the futuristic experiential space in the Wipro campus, Bangalore. From an installation made out of clocks and colourful cables titled Time Tree to lines replicating race tracks, the space is built around a Formula 1 theme.”The F1 pit stop has been used as a metaphor for speedy customer service,” explains the designer.Just like the sport, design, according to Mannan, is synonymous with play. But it is serious play, and he definitely wants to stay ahead of the pack.advertisementlast_img read more

PBA: Columbian lands another big fish in NorthPort

first_imgPaolo Taha vs Jackson Corpuz. PBA IMAGESANTIPOLO, Philippines – Columbian grabbed command late in the third quarter on Friday night and claimed another big fish in the PBA Philippine Cup eliminations after posting a 110-100 victory over NorthPort at Ynares Center here.The Dyip came roaring back from 10 points down in that quarter and took an 86-79 lead into the fourth, which they protected with much ferociousness on the way to handing the Batang Pier their first defeat in three games.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations LATEST STORIES Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem In tying their victims at 2-1, the Dyip survived a huge first half by Mo Tautuaa by getting him to pick up a fourth foul early in the third and holding down NorthPort’s prolific rookie Robert Bolick to just three points.Jackson Corpuz and pint-sized rookie point guard John Paul Calvo were big during the breakaway with the NorthPort coaching staff never finding ways to stop them when it mattered.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsStanley Pringle scored 14 points in the third quarter built around three triples that had NorthPort threatening to break the game wide open. But the lack of support later on–and with Tautuaa never getting back in the groove after 20 first-half points–sealed the Batang Pier’s doom.There were seven players in twin digits for the Dyip, whose first big victim was four-time defending champion San Miguel Beer two weeks ago. ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Yeng Guiao unfazed by NLEX’s 0-3 start: ‘We’ll be okay if we gain momentum’ View comments Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town MOST READ Oil plant explodes in Pampanga townlast_img read more